The Mongolian rise to Power

The Mongolian rise to Power

Since 2013, thanks to the Mongolian government all nomadic people have access to electricity.

Let’s get into the saddle and discover more!

To get some facts and background; 30% of Mongolia’s population are traditional horse-riding nomadic people. Little has changed since the days of the Mighty Genghis Khan.

23d4416369fee97925ed8a207e790dd8

Mongolia is known as the “Land of the Eternal Blue Sky” because it has over 250 sunny days a year.  Don’t need to think twice to know that getting some Power from the Sun would be a good idea.

Since they are moving around all the time, nomadic people live in the so-called GER districts. Many of you maybe more familiar with the term yurt. These Gers are portable, round tents and covered with skins, felt and yak’s wool.

 

Mongolian-ger-at-dawnmongolia-yurt-ger-construction-301-592x393

Living in these Gers not as easy – peasy as we imagine with no electricity and running water. How they can survive without modern conveniences?!

But there is a change in the air for the life of the world’s last true nomads. New homes with Portable Solar Panels!

The electricity generated from the portable solar panels can make a fridge running, so they can keep food longer. They can charge the essential gadget of our modern life, the mobile phone, to keep in touch with distant family members and contact emergency health-care.

More importantly, they can watch telly now and access the internet, so they know the weather forecast beforehand, what is great for their shepherd’s life!

 

1mongolia1-Stephan-Bachenheimer_World-Bank

 

Thanks to this cool and relevant technology they can continue their traditional lifestyle, but the quality of their life is improved.

The solar systems ar slowly replacing the diesel generators used by some nomads as a means of generating power.

This is a great example of how by embracing the clean energy technology available today, very low tech ways of living can be brought into the modern age without having to build huge, expensive power stations, or polluting the landscapes they rely on for their livelihoods.

 

Want to know how we can help you?

Contact Form Callback Request